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End for can and plastic banks

 
Created on 23/11/2016 @ 09:13
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Cans and plastic banks will be removed from all community recycling sites in the county by the end of March 2017, Powys County Council has confirmed.

The banks will be removed as every household in the county can now have their cans and plastics collected from the kerbside.

The council will start removing the banks next month.  Notices will be placed on the banks at least two weeks before they are removed.

Councillor John Powell, Cabinet Member for Environment and Sustainability, said: “The cans and plastics banks have made a significant contribution to our recycling rates in the past. 

“Unfortunately we are unable to control the use of the cans/plastics containers at community recycling sites and as a result a number of these banks are regularly abused with members of the public using them to dispose of general household waste. This not only contaminates any recyclable material within the banks but also results in additional disposal costs to the council as we are not able to recycle a large amount of this material.

“We encourage residents to recycle cans and plastics (bottles, pots, tubs and trays) using their weekly kerbside collection instead and we are happy to provide additional red boxes on request. Collecting plastics from the kerbside allows us to maintain the quality, ensuring that it is all recycled and that we can get the best possible price for the material.

“Our latest recycling figures show that the county recycled over 3,800 tonnes of material in September, an impressive 66% of all material and well above the county’s statutory target of 58% of material being recycled during the year.

“By recycling your waste wherever possible, we can reduce the amount sent to landfill and also help to achieve the strict recycling targets set by Welsh Government and we would like to thank all householders for their recycling efforts.”

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